Twonky 6.0.30 on Qnap TS 209 Pro II Cannot Remove Login name

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Budgie
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Twonky 6.0.30 on Qnap TS 209 Pro II Cannot Remove Login name

Post by Budgie » Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 am

I have a problem with a persistent name and password. I no longer need these but if I delete them and save changes they return after a few seconds. What is going on please and how can I stop this.
Regards,
Budgie

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Briain
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Re: Twonky 6.0.30 on Qnap TS 209 Pro II Cannot Remove Login

Post by Briain » Sun Mar 06, 2011 8:24 pm

Hi

I expect they'll be stored in the ini file which will likely be /etc/config/twonkyvision-mediaserver6.ini

You can use SSH (and PuTTY) to navigate to that directory, copy it to one of the shares and open it with Notepad++ (free download) which better 'understands' Unix format files (the end of line code is slightly different from Windows files, so best not to use Microsoft's built-in Windows Notepad). You can either edit it (to remove the password) and then copy it back (to overwrite the existing one), or you can simply delete the original, then restart Twonky (it should build a new one automatically; it uses the default.ini file to build the replacement). If you have any unforeseen problems after deleting it, you can simply replace it with the one you've copied to the share.

If you remove the password then put the file back, there will be no other changes. If you decide to delete it instead, you will have to go into Twonky config and apply any custom settings (the media paths, server name, rescan time, etc).

If you are unsure about PuTTY and SSH, have a look at my post here. That post shows how to open PuTTY and copy a file to the NAS (it's actually for changing the music trees) but the principles are exactly the same. In your case, you could do the below.

Log in using PuTTY (as shown in that post) then type the following commands:

cd /etc/config
cp twonkyvision-mediaserver6.ini /share/Web

Leave the PuTTY session open, then use Windows to look at the Web share and Notepad++ to open and edit the twonkyvision-mediaserver6.ini file, then go back to the PuTTY session and do the following to copy it back

cp /share/Web/twonkyvision-mediaserver6.ini . (the dot after the space means 'to here').

Restart Twonky and it should now be password free.

Bri

Budgie
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Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 5:41 pm

Re: Twonky 6.0.30 on Qnap TS 209 Pro II Cannot Remove Login

Post by Budgie » Tue Mar 08, 2011 11:32 am

Hi Briain,
Thanks for the reply. My concern is the apparent creep of data associated with the embedded twonky over to the qpkg version. This should not happen but I had reached the same conclusion as you. Will go in and sort it out when I have time.
Regards,
Budgie

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Briain
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Re: Twonky 6.0.30 on Qnap TS 209 Pro II Cannot Remove Login

Post by Briain » Thu Mar 10, 2011 3:20 pm

Hi

If you look at the twonkymedia6.sh (which is also used to set up the symbolic links and also to start Twonky) it defines which files the QPKG uses (the one I've pointed out above). Below are the ones it points to (the below one is taken from a TS-219P+):

TWONKYSRV="${QPKG_DIR}/${DAEMON}"
INIFILE="/etc/config/twonkyvision-mediaserver6.ini"
DEFAULT_INIFILE="${QPKG_DIR}/twonkymedia6-default.ini"
LOG_FILE="${QPKG_DIR}/twonkymediaserver6-log.txt"

The ini file is created by Twonky and contains a combination of both many standard settings and any bespoke information it sees in the default.ini file. If you delete the ini file and restart Twonky, it creates a replacement one. I've tested that on the ReadyNAS version but not actually tried it on Qnap's installation; it should behave in the same way and thus re-create the file when Twonky is restarted.

When I was testing licensed Twonky versions on the ReadyNAS, to save me lots of time, I used to populate the default ini with settings for media paths, cache size limits, my Twonky license key, etc. When I then installed any new versions, I simply replaced the default ini with my bespoke default ini file and deleted the standard ini file. When I then restarted it, it created a new normal ini file populated with all the configuration settings that I wanted (so I didn't have to use the web interface to set anything).

Hope that helps by explaining how it works.
Bri

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